Tutorials on config manager plugins

In this section more advanced solutions will be shown. The examples will introduce complex infrastructures or will introduce more complex features of the Occopus tool.

Please, note that the following examples require a properly configured Occopus, therefore we suggest to continue this section if you already followed the instructions written in the Installation section.

Chef-Apache2

This tutorial uses Chef as a configuration management tool to deploy a one-node infrastructure containing an Apache2 web server.

Features

  • using Chef as a configuration management tool to deploy services
  • assembling the run-lists of the chef-clients on the nodes

Prerequisites

  • accessing a cloud through an Occopus-compatible interface (e.g. EC2, OCCI, Nova, etc.)
  • target cloud contains a base OS image with cloud-init support (image id, instance type)
  • accessing the Chef server as user by Occopus (user name, user key)
  • accessing the Chef server as client by the nodes (validator client name, validator client key)
  • apache2 community recipe (available at Chef Supermarket) and its dependencies uploaded to target Chef Server

Download

You can download the example as tutorial.examples.chef-apache2 .

Steps

  1. Open the file nodes/node_definitions.yaml and edit the resource section of the nodes labelled by node_def:.

    The downloadable package for this example contains a resource template for the EC2 plugin.

  2. Make sure your authentication information is set correctly in your authentication file. You must set your email and password in the authentication file. Setting authentication information is described here.

  3. Edit nodes/node_definitions.yaml. Configure the config_management. Set the endpoint to the url of your Chef Server.

    'node_def:chef_apache2_node':
        -
            resource:
               ...
            ...
            config_management:
               type: chef
               endpoint: replace_with_url_of_chef_server
               run_list:
                   - recipe[apache2]
            ...
    
  4. Edit the nodes/cloud_init_chef.yaml contextualization file. Set the following attributes:

    • server_url is the url of your Chef Server (e.g. “https://chef.yourorg.com:4000”).
    • validation_name the name of the validator client through which nodes register to your chef server.
    • validation_key the public key belonging to the validator client.
    Example:
    
    validation_name: "yourorg-validator"
    validation_key: |
        -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
        YOUR-ORGS-VALIDATION-KEY-HERE
        -----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    

    Important

    Make sure you do not mix the validator client with user belonging to the Chef Server.

    ...
    chef:
       install_type: omnibus
       omnibus_url: "https://www.opscode.com/chef/install.sh"
       force_install: false
       server_url: "replace_with_your_chef_server_url"
       environment: {{infra_id}}
       node_name: {{node_id}}
       validation_name: "replace_with_chef_validation_client_name"
       validation_key: |
           replace_with_chef_validation_client_key
    ...
    

    Important

    Do not modify the value of “environment” and “node_name” attributes!

    Note

    For further explanation of the keywords, please read the cloud-init documentation!

  5. Make sure your authentication information is set correctly in your authentication file. You must set your authentication data for the resource you would like to use, as well as the authentication data for the config_management section. Setting authentication information for both is described here.

    Important

    Do not forget to set your Chef credentials!

  6. Load the node definitions into the database.

    Important

    Occopus takes node definitions from its database when builds up the infrastructure, so importing is necessary whenever the node definition or any imported (e.g. contextualisation) file changes!

    occopus-import nodes/node_definitions.yaml
    
  7. Start deploying the infrastructure. Make sure the proper virtualenv is activated!

    occopus-build infra-chef-apache2.yaml
    
  8. After successful finish, the nodes with ip address and node id are listed at the end of the logging messages and the identifier of the newly built infrastructure is printed. You can store the identifier of the infrastructure to perform further operations on your infra or alternatively you can query the identifier using the occopus-maintain command.

    List of nodes/ip addresses:
    apache2:
        192.168.xxx.xxx (3116eaf5-89e7-405f-ab94-9550ba1d0a7c)
    14032858-d628-40a2-b611-71381bd463fa
    
  9. Finally, you may destroy the infrastructure using the infrastructure id returned by occopus-build

    occopus-destroy -i 14032858-d628-40a2-b611-71381bd463fa
    

Chef-Wordpress

This tutorial uses Chef as a configuration management tool to deploy a two-node infrastructure containing a MySQL server node and a Wordpress node. The Wordpress node will connect to the MySQL database.

Features

  • using Chef as a configuration management tool to deploy services
  • passing variables to Chef through Occopus
  • assembling the run-lists of the chef-clients on the nodes
  • checking MySQL database availability on a node
  • checking url availability on a node

Prerequisites

  • accessing a cloud through an Occopus-compatible interface (e.g. EC2, OCCI, Nova, etc.)
  • target cloud contains a base OS image with cloud-init support (image id, instance type)
  • accessing the Chef server as user by Occopus (user name, user key)
  • accessing the Chef server as client by the nodes (validator client name, validator client key)
  • wordpress community recipe (available at Chef Supermarket) and its dependencies uploaded to target Chef Server
  • database-setup recipe (provided in example package at Download) uploaded to target Chef server

Download

You can download the example as tutorial.examples.chef-wordpress .

Steps

  1. Open the file nodes/node_definitions.yaml and edit the resource section of the nodes labelled by node_def:.

    The downloadable package for this example contains a resource template for the EC2 plugin.

  2. Edit nodes/node_definitions.yaml. For each node, configure the config_management. Set the endpoint to the url of your Chef Server.

    'node_def:chef_mysql_node':
        -
            resource:
               ...
            ...
            config_management:
               type: chef
               endpoint: replace_with_url_of_chef_server
               run_list:
                   - recipe[database-setup::db]
            ...
    'node_def:chef_wordpress_node':
        -
            resource:
               ...
            ...
            config_management:
               type: chef
               endpoint: replace_with_url_of_chef_server
               run_list:
                   - recipe[wordpress]
            ...
    
  3. Edit the nodes/cloud_init_chef.yaml contextualization file. Set the following attributes:

    • server_url is the url of your Chef Server (e.g. “https://chef.yourorg.com:4000”).
    • validation_name the name of the validator client through which nodes register to your chef server.
    • validation_key the public key belonging to the validator client.
    Example:
    
    validation_name: "yourorg-validator"
    validation_key: |
        -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
        YOUR-ORGS-VALIDATION-KEY-HERE
        -----END RSA PRIVATE KEY-----
    

    Important

    Make sure you do not mix the validator client with user belonging to the Chef Server.

    ...
    chef:
       install_type: omnibus
       omnibus_url: "https://www.opscode.com/chef/install.sh"
       force_install: false
       server_url: "replace_with_your_chef_server_url"
       environment: {{infra_id}}
       node_name: {{node_id}}
       validation_name: "replace_with_chef_validation_client_name"
       validation_key: |
           replace_with_chef_validation_client_key
    ...
    

    Important

    Do not modify the value of “environment” and “node_name” attributes!

    Note

    For further explanation of the keywords, please read the cloud-init documentation!

  4. Edit infra-chef-wordpress.yaml. Set your desired root password, database name, username, and user password for your MySQL database in the variables section. These parameters will be applied when creating the mysql database.

    ...
    variables:
       mysql_root_password: replace_with_database_root_password
       mysql_database_name: replace_with_database_name
       mysql_dbuser_username: replace_with_database_username
       mysql_dbuser_password: replace_with_database_user_password
    
  5. Make sure your authentication information is set correctly in your authentication file. You must set your authentication data for the resource you would like to use, as well as the authentication data for the config_management section. Setting authentication information for both is described here.

    Important

    Do not forget to set your Chef credentials!

  6. Load the node definitions into the database.

    Important

    Occopus takes node definitions from its database when builds up the infrastructure, so importing is necessary whenever the node definition or any imported (e.g. contextualisation) file changes!

    occopus-import nodes/node_definitions.yaml
    
  7. Start deploying the infrastructure. Make sure the proper virtualenv is activated!

    occopus-build infra-chef-wordpress.yaml
    
  8. After successful finish, the nodes with ip address and node id are listed at the end of the logging messages and the identifier of the newly built infrastructure is printed. You can store the identifier of the infrastructure to perform further operations on your infra or alternatively you can query the identifier using the occopus-maintain command.

    List of nodes/ip addresses:
    mysql-server:
        192.168.xxx.xxx (3116eaf5-89e7-405f-ab94-9550ba1d0a7c)
    wordpress:
        192.168.xxx.xxx (894fe127-28c9-4c8f-8c5f-2f120c69b9c3)
    14032858-d628-40a2-b611-71381bd463fa
    
  9. Finally, you may destroy the infrastructure using the infrastructure id returned by occopus-build

    occopus-destroy -i 14032858-d628-40a2-b611-71381bd463fa
    

PuppetSolo-Wordpress

This tutorial uses Puppet as a configuration management tool in a server-free mode to deploy a two-node infrastructure containing a MySQL server node and a Wordpress node. The Wordpress node will connect to the MySQL database.

Features

  • using server-free Puppet as a configuration management tool to deploy services
  • defining puppet manifests and modules
  • passing attributes to Puppet through Occopus
  • checking MySQL database availability on a node
  • checking url availability on a node

Prerequisites

  • accessing a cloud through an Occopus-compatible interface (e.g. EC2, OCCI, Nova, etc.)
  • target cloud contains a base OS image with cloud-init support (image id, instance type)
  • wordpress-init puppet recipe (provided in example package at Download)
  • mysql-init puppet recipe (provided in example package at Download)

Download

You can download the example as tutorial.examples.puppet-solo-wordpress .

Steps

  1. Open the file nodes/node_definitions.yaml and edit the resource section of the nodes labelled by node_def:.

    The downloadable package for this example contains a resource template for the EC2 plugin.

  2. Edit infra-puppet-solo-wordpress.yaml. Set your desired root password, database name, username, and user password for your MySQL database in the variables section. These parameters will be applied when creating the mysql database and also used by wordpress node when connecting to mysql.

    ...
    variables:
       mysql_root_password: replace_with_database_root_password
       mysql_database_name: replace_with_database_name
       mysql_dbuser_username: replace_with_database_username
       mysql_dbuser_password: replace_with_database_user_password
    
  3. Load the node definitions into the database.

    Important

    Occopus takes node definitions from its database when builds up the infrastructure, so importing is necessary whenever the node definition or any imported (e.g. contextualisation) file changes!

    occopus-import nodes/node_definitions.yaml
    
  4. Start deploying the infrastructure. Make sure the proper virtualenv is activated!

    occopus-build infra-puppet-solo-wordpress.yaml
    
  5. After successful finish, the nodes with ip address and node id are listed at the end of the logging messages and the identifier of the newly built infrastructure is printed. You can store the identifier of the infrastructure to perform further operations on your infra or alternatively you can query the identifier using the occopus-maintain command.

    List of nodes/ip addresses:
    mysql-server:
        192.168.xxx.xxx (3116eaf5-89e7-405f-ab94-9550ba1d0a7c)
    wordpress:
        192.168.xxx.xxx (894fe127-28c9-4c8f-8c5f-2f120c69b9c3)
    14032858-d628-40a2-b611-71381bd463fa
    
  6. Finally, you may destroy the infrastructure using the infrastructure id returned by occopus-build

    occopus-destroy -i 14032858-d628-40a2-b611-71381bd463fa
    

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